Rassegna stampa su conflitto afghano agosto 2021

Questi appunti sono una raccolta di articoli critici in italiano e inglese che sono usciti nel mese di agosto 2021 per commentare l’evoluzione finale del conflitto afghano. In redazione siamo convinti che questa guerra è stato un errore madornale di cui pagheremo le conseguenze e i danni per anni. La cosa che ancora ci sconcerta è stata l’imcapacità totale della comunità intellettuale europea di opporsi a questo scempio.

Today I will live – Oggi voglio vivere di Nico Piro

Un “corto” promemoria sulle vittime dimenticate di crisi dimenticate (ottobre 2019) diventato incidentalmente il booktrailer di “Corrispondenze Afghane” di Nico Piro.
Versione italiana di “Today I will live”

America’s War on Terror is the True Cause of Europe’s Refugee Crisis – CounterPunch.org

Desperate refugees crammed into cockle-shell boats landing on the shingle beaches of the south Kent coast are easily portrayed as invaders. Anti-immigrant demonstrators were exploiting such fears last weekend as they blockaded the main highway into Dover Port in order “to protect Britain’s borders”. Meanwhile, the home secretary, Priti Patel, blames the French for not doing enough to stop the flow of refugees across the Channel. More Source: America’s War…Continue reading America’s War on Terror is the True Cause of Europe’s Refugee Crisis – CounterPunch.org

War in Afghanistan in 2020: Just as much violence, but no one wants to talk about it – Afghanistan Analysts Network – English

As memories of the relative peace of the Eid ul-Adha ceasefire fade and direct talks between the government and the Taleban should be about to begin, it seems a good time to look again at what has been happening in the conflict since the United States and the Taleban signed their agreement on 29 February. […] Source: War in Afghanistan in 2020: Just as much violence, but no one wants…Continue reading War in Afghanistan in 2020: Just as much violence, but no one wants to talk about it – Afghanistan Analysts Network – English

How the House Armed Services Committee, in the Middle of a Pandemic, Approved a Huge Military Budget and More War in Afghanistan

The least-discussed congressional proceedings are often the most consequential — and almost always bipartisan. While the country is subsumed by both public health and an unemployment crisis, and is separately focused on a sustained protest movement against police abuses, a massive $740.5 billion military spending package was approved last week by the Democratic-controlled House Armed Services Committee.

How Bad is the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act? – CounterPunch.org

Somehow, Congress couldn’t find the time last week to renew extended unemployment benefits or the federal moratorium on evictions. Congress had something more pressing to think about than 30 million unemployed Americans: the Pentagon budget. On July 21 and 23, the House of Representatives and the Senate approved their versions of the Pentagon’s annual spending More Source: How Bad is the 2021 National Defense Authorization Act? – CounterPunch.org